Friday, May 11, 2018

Chasing Footnotes - Coyne Encounter, Update

To recap briefly, I noted that Richard Dolan and Jennie Randles suggested that Mansfield had said that there was no other traffic in the area the night of Coyne incident. That would suggest no air refueling aircraft had made the close approach.

The endnotes by both suggested that the information had come from Jennie Zeidman, but I haven’t been able to find that specific reference. To be fair, I have not consulted her book published by CUFOS about it, but then, in her later writings and lectures about the case, she didn’t seem to mention it. I have seen the information as supplied in the Flying Saucer Review article and looked at her 1989 MUFON Symposium paper. All that took me to a dead end.

However, on May 9, 2018, I spoke with Robert Yanascek, the crew chief on the helicopter, about the sighting and asked two relevant questions. First, I wanted to know what he had seen that night. He had reported it as an “unidentified object with light.” He told me that it was shaped something like a submarine silhouetted against the bright starry background with a bright red light at the front and a bright light at the rear. In other words, a cylindrically shaped object that didn’t look like any conventional aircraft. He also mentioned that the red and green lights didn’t look like the navigation lights seen on aircraft. His experience was extensive which included tours as a helicopter crew chief in Vietnam.

Second, I asked about attempts to learn what had been flying in the area that night. He told me that they checked with Mansfield and the FAA. They were told that there was nothing else flying in their area.

What this means here, is that I have been able to find a source who was involved that night and who said that they had been unable to verify any other aircraft in the area. I would still like to find any reference in which Jennie Zeidman said that Mansfield had said there was no other traffic around them. However, since I have a source who was there, at the time, and the statement is confirmed as having come from the participants, this seems to prove that nothing else was in the air. That includes the Air Force refueling aircraft and, at lease, one additional helicopter. There could have been more for a training mission like this, but there had to be one. Documentation confirming all this would be helpful, but frankly, not overly necessary, given what we now know.

Helicopters in formation in Vietnam. Photo copyright by Kevin Randle.
I worried about a question about why the craft didn’t show up on radar. My go to answer these days is “Stealth,” which could apply to an alien craft but certainly not to an Air Force Tanker in 1973. However, it seems that Parabunk has supplied that answer. He wrote, “I just found out that Mansfield didn't have a radar before 1982 (sources at the end of my blog post), so the closest one was probably at Cleveland Hopkins Airport, some 50 miles away.


What is also important here is that these flights were made under IFR, that is Instrument Flight Rules,” and because some of the flight would have been above 14,000 feet, a flight plan would have been required. Had a refueling aircraft been in the area, Mansfield would have had a record of it. When Coyne and his flight crew checked on other aircraft in the area, small, private planes flying VFR (visual flight rules) wouldn’t necessarily have a flight plan and there might not be a record of their flight. Military aircraft would have a flight plan. This seems to rule out any sort of Air Force refueling plane. I can say that with the confidence of someone who is still looking for records and data which might change that conclusion.

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Brad Steiger Has Died

My friend, Brad Steiger, has passed away, after what I believe was a long illness. You can read the obituary here:

http://funeralinnovations.com/obituary/257658/Brad-Steiger/

I first learned of Brad while I was still in high school. As I have mentioned in the past, I read Strangers in the Skies, while sitting in study hall, and while that didn’t spark my interest in UFOs, it certainly set me on a track to study them.

Brad Steiger
While in college, one of my friends from Clinton, Iowa, told me about a fellow there, Warren Smith, who wrote about UFOs and the paranormal. He often paired with Brad writing books, sometimes under the pen name of Eric Norman. Brad, it seems had invented the name, but it was often Smith who used it.

In the 1970s, I was working on a book about the paranormal (which, by the way, was never published) and I was discussing the tales of people who seemed to have vanished in very mysterious ways. One of those cases was from 1909, and Brad had written about it. Given that I had met Smith, I knew the secret for finding Brad. He had been born as Eugene Olson and had adopted the name Brad Steiger because he admired the actor, Rod Steiger. Anyway, I knew that Brad taught at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa, and was listed in the telephone book as Eugene Olsen. Back in those days, without the Internet, I used Directory Assistance to get the telephone number and called Brad.

He was most cordial and told me that he had learned, since his book that contained the story was published, that the case was a hoax. We had a long chat, and that began the friendship that lasted for decades.

When I hosted my radio show in the 1990s (and yes, it was on the radio because podcasts didn’t exist) on KTSM-AM in El Paso, Texas, Brad was one of my first guests and often helped me to book others that he knew. If I was in some kind of a jam for the program, I could count on him to either fill the void, or find someone to step in.

Brad and Sherry Steiger
We often shared information about UFOs, sometimes about ghosts or other aspects of the paranormal. He helped me on several occasions, providing some insight to a specific case or avenue for research. Sometimes, he would provide inside information. On one occasion, as we talked about Al Bielek, who had stayed with Brad and Sherry several times over the years, they learned that Bielek’s tale might not be grounded in reality. Both were disappointed to discover that a friend had been less than candid in his tales of time travel and the Allende Letters case.

Which reminds me that back in the early 1970s, while I was still on active duty in the Army, I read Brad’s book (written with Joan Whritenhour) about the Allende case. It seems that one of Brad’s friends had written to the Navy, which provided information about the case. My thought was that if he could do it, so could I. Brad, you might say, was the inspiration for that bit of investigation… but I digress.

At one of the MUFON Symposiums held in Denver, I don’t remember if it was 2010 or 2011, a fellow came up and said that I had written more UFO books than anyone else. I immediately said that I didn’t think so. I thought it was Brad. Later, Brad and I had a chuckle about this and I don’t believe we ever resolved who had written more… not that we cared. We did notice that Nick Redfern was making a real run at this “record.”

When I began my last radio show/podcast on the X-Zone Broadcast Network, I thought that one of the first guests should be Brad. We exchanged emails and while Brad was delighted with the offer, he had just returned to Iowa and there were many problems getting settled, getting the house ready, and confidentially, his health wasn’t the best. He had an open invitation and we had even scheduled what I thought of as our Halloween “Spooktacular” show, to talk of UFOs and ghosts and other things that wen bump in the night. Brad had to cancel for health reasons. I was, of course, disappointed, but then so was Brad.

We finally worked out the details, and Brad did make an appearance on the show. It was, of course, one of the easiest interviews because Brad was the perfect guest. He knew how to answer a question, knew where to go to make the topic interesting, and in this case, said some very nice things about me. You can listen to that interview here:


Not all that long ago, I learned that Brad’s health was declining. He asked that I not share the information, which I didn’t. I was sad to hear about his health problems and worried about them. And, of course, sadden to learn that they had caught up with him.

A young Brad Steiger.
Brad was born on February 19, 1936, apparently in a blizzard in Iowa. His career took him around the country, he appeared on dozens of radio and television shows, and hosted and produced some himself. He had a near death experience when he was 11 which changed his life. He was interested in UFOs, angels, the paranormal, and, of course, near death experiences. He once told me that he accepted what people told him until he learned that they couldn’t be trusted. He didn’t look for the bad and didn’t belittle those with whom he disagreed. He had a belief in people and in their goodness, realizing that some simply were no good.

I admired his philosophy in life but the cynic in me didn’t let me accept everyone so readily. He assisted me when he could, provided help when I asked, and I never heard him say anything nasty about anyone, though he had cause to do so on more than one occasion. I suppose you would say that he had a good heart, enjoyed what he was doing, and had more than a little fun doing it.

Had I known that the last time I would speak to him would be during that interview, I probably would have done things a little differently. But you just never know. I’ll miss him, as I’m sure many others will as well. Take a moment to think of him during the next few days, and don’t forget to include Sherry, his wife since 1987, in your thoughts.


Brad was 82.

Tuesday, May 08, 2018

Chasing Footnotes - The Coyne Edition

In an abbreviated version of chasing footnotes, I found some information that is relevant to the discussion about the Coyne helicopter case. I took a look at Richard Dolan’s UFOs and the National Seurity State. He wrote, on page 384 “When he [Coyne] tried
UH-1H helicopters in flight. Photo
copyright by Kevin Randle.
to confirm the existence of a craft out of Mansfield, his UHF and VHF frequencies went dead (Mansfield later confirmed there were no aircraft in the area).”

Dolan’s endnote, which included a couple of sources, mentioned Jennie Randles (no relation, please note the “S” at the end of her name), and her The UFO Conspiracy. On page 103, she wrote, “Mansfield later confirmed that they did not have any aircraft in the area.”

She didn’t use endnotes, but the whole, short chapter was devoted to the Coyne and she noted her information came from Flying Saucer Review, Volume 22, No. 4 (1976). I don’t have a copy of that magazine so that I couldn’t chase this any farther.

Jerry Clark covers the case in his UFO Encyclopedia but mentions nothing about Mansfield saying they had no traffic in the area.
Zeidman, in her MUFON Symposium presentation in 1989, mentioned nothing about there being no other traffic in the area.

What all this means here, simply, is that I’m currently at a dead end, but not at the end of the discussion. If someone has a copy of the Flying Saucer Review article, I’d appreciate knowing what it said. A copy would be better.


So, at the moment, I have Dolan quoting Randles who was quoting Zeidman. I have not found the Zeidman quote at this time, which means only, that I haven’t found the quote. The search goes on.

Wednesday, May 02, 2018

John Greenewald's Take on AATIP - Updated

(Blogger’s note: My pal, John Greenewald, had attempted to post this to the comment section of the last column, but it is too long to be accepted there. Rather than breaking it into several pieces, I decided to just add it as a new post. It clarifies some of the issues that have been raised about the AATIP and the like. You can find additional information about a wide variety of topics at www.theblackvault.com.)

John Greenewald - Photo copyright by
Kevin Randle

It references some stuff "above" etc., because this is only a portion of the article. I pasted it here though in hopes it addressed my thoughts on this very topic...
----
There is a lot wrong with this statement, and although it could be partially true, nothing is "official" yet -- and at the root -- only muddies the water, it does not help to clean it up.
Here is why: First and foremost, many are talking about how this is a "new" revelation discovered by Mr. Paul Dean from Australia. He writes (in part):

In March, 2018, I was contacted by someone who claimed to be in a senior defence program leadership role. He stated that the UFO program on everyone’s lips was not officially called the “Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program” (AATIP). This was, apparently, a loose, almost ad hoc term for one part of a somewhat larger defence program. The true name of the overall program, or at least the official starting title, was the “Advanced Aerospace Weapons Systems Application Program” (AAWSAP), or something extremely similar.

Of course, all this is based on what a DoD contact told me. The term “Advanced Aerospace Weapons Systems Application Program”, or its “AAWSAP” abbreviation, hasn’t been mentioned by anyone else. Not the New York Times, not Luis Elizondo, and not even the DIA’s public relations staffers who must, by now, have been flooded with enquiries. 

As I eluded, Glassel has found two examples of the AAWSAP project title. This had been shared privately with me, by two people, and I thought that there was simply no references available to absolutely confirm them for sure. I searched, but with no luck. Well, the “Advanced Aerospace Weapons Systems Application Program” indeed did, or does, exist. Glassel, on a hunch, with keen-eyed Curt Collins in tow, discovered that Dr. Eric Davis, who has been closely associated with the AATIP and TTSA story, had published a number of scientific papers for the DIA, and two of those publications were already released and available online. The titles are, “Traversable Wormholes, Stargates and Negative Energy” and “Warp Drive, Dark Energy and the Manipulation of Extra Dimensions”. Both are listed as “Defence Intelligence Reference Documents” and both were published in late 2009.

What I gather is that the AATIP desk was a major part of the overall AAWSAP effort. Also, the term AATIP was developed over time, and may have been tacked on to, or into, AAWSAP. AATIP was a looser title for internal usage, and it continued in other channels while the overall AAWSAP appears to have ended. 

It should first be pointed out that all this was given to Mr. Dean by an "anonymous" source, at least "anonymous" to the public.  Anonymous sources may not be a bad thing, but they don't help, especially with this topic. Mr. Dean claims that whoever the source is, they have a clean security record. That could very well be true, but as indicated in Mr. Dean's article, when read in full, he said this contact even got the name wrong wherein words were traversed and/or changed based on multiple documents that surfaced "confirming" this new name. Why would he get them wrong if he was a clean "source"? 

That leads me to my second problem with this new story. The documents referenced above, used to "confirm" this new program, have been available online since at least December 18, 2017. There is nothing "new" about them: 

Source 2  


I saw these documents back in late December and early January, but dismissed them as they are largely sourced/credited to Corey Goode, a very controversial figure to begin with. If they are genuine (and they may be) these documents do not appear that they were released under any official channels.  They may be real, I am not saying they are fake, but until they are officially released under FOIA, or acknowledged as genuine by a figure in the government, they should not be considered gospel, especially considering the source. According to another blog, it is said that Dr. Eric Davis confirmed these documents were real -- but this (at the point of writing this) is third hand information.  

It also should be noted, as I wrote the answer to the question above this one which has been on The Black Vault now for months, records like this are already publicly available which were written by Dr. Eric Davis. It would not surprise me if these documents are, in fact, genuine, but even if they are, they don't teach us anything new. We already could deduce the Defense Intelligence Research Documents (DIRDs) as referenced by Dr. Davis on Coast to Coast AM, were probably going to be along the same lines as what I found while answering the question above and those documents ARE IRREFUTABLY genuine.  In the end, just because a document is written about Warp Drives and advanced propulsion, doesn't mean the government took it seriously, built the devices or continued the research within the walls of the black budget intelligence community. 

So, I go back to my point that this is only muddying the waters.  Because as of April 30, 2018, this new material is summarized like this:  We have a name that came from an anonymous source, that coincided with a name on a "leaked" document three months prior, but is being reported in the last days of April 2018 as a "new" discovery and it has long been kept in "secret" by Mr. Dean but is now released to the public as to it being some big reveal.  We can prove this is all not true with the source links above, and the name (whether it is, or is not a genuine program name) was available on the internet for months prior to even when the "anonymous source" came forward.

Lastly, this "new name" is confirmed by these "leaked" documents, as sourced to Corey Goode. He is a highly controversial (and largely dismissed by many) figure alleging a connection between himself and a "Secret Space Program".  We can now comfortably QUESTION these documents based on these facts, not write about them as the nail in the coffin proof as some are stating in their blogs.  


This deserves repeating: this is only muddying the waters of an already muddied ocean.  When we have real documents (not leaked) that prove it, we should publish them.  Until that time, articles/allegations/claims etc. like this have not progressed this story one bit.  

Tuesday, May 01, 2018

The Coyne Helicopter Encounter - Explained?

For the last several days I have been engaged in a conversation with someone who identifies himself as Parabunk. He analyzed the Coyne helicopter encounter and provided what he believed to be a terrestrial solution for the case. You can read his long report here:


You can read my original post which inspired his (well, maybe not inspired to write his report, but certainly inspired to mention it on this blog), and read our discussion in the comments section here:


By looking at both these articles, I think you’ll get a fairly accurate picture of both his theory and my comments on it. I thought his theory interesting and certainly does cover most of the information about the case, though he seems to lean heavily on interviews conducted with First Lieutenant Arrigo Jezzi and seems to reject those made by Captain Lawrence J. Coyne who was both the senior officer present and the pilot in command of the aircraft.

The point here, however, is something a little different. While I believe that I came into this as an almost neutral observer, ready to examine the facts, I also realize that my thinking might be colored by my personal experiences. On the other hand, I think Parabunk might suffer from the same sort of narrowed vision. To that end, I thought having the readers here take a look at both arguments and append their comments to this post, we might move the discussion forward.

I believe that a good mix of skeptics and believers visit here on a regular basis so that we might see some interesting comments. I think we can keep it cordial (and I will delete anything that doesn’t fit into that ideal), which it should be, and maybe provide some interesting insights into the case and possible avenues for further research.

One of the first places to start would be the “Disposition Form” dated 23 November 1973 because it provides the names of organizations that might have follow up documents that could shed some light on the subject. It also mentions a near midair collision which seem to require an investigation by the FAA, even if it was with a UFO. And, because it was created just a few weeks after the event, we have something that isn’t overly influenced by all the discussion of so many over the last forty some years.




Let’s see if this does provide us with some sort of insight to the event with an eye to providing more information about it.

Sunday, April 29, 2018

MUFON's Inner Circle

Last year I wrote about the MUFON Inner Circle and offered some criticism about a couple of the members. There was something of a debate about what exactly the Inner Circle was and what sort of influence it might have over the MUFON leadership and the directions the organization was taking. I published the list of the members which was no big deal because they could be found at the MUFON website. Periodically I had been looking to see if the membership of the Inner Circle changed.

And what I found was that it had. I do not know the reasons for the change but suspect it might have to do with the hefty price tag for membership. As of April 29, 2018, these are the members of the Inner Circle:

Ed L’Heureux, David MacDonald, Clifford Clift, Efroymson Family Fund, Jennifer Stein, Jan C. Harzan, John Schuessler, Debbie Ziegelmeyer, John Grace, Michael Limotte, Cindy Dupont and Holly Baker.
About the only comment I have here is that I wonder if Jan Harzan is
Jan Harzan
a member because he is the Executive Director or if he kicked in the five grand. None of my business really, and if he is in because he is the Executive Director, that makes sense. One of the benefits are consultations with the Executive Director… besides, membership might be a perk of holding the title. As I say, not really any of my business and I mention it only out of idle curiosity.


At the moment, these are the members. Twelve of them, as there were last year, but I think of that as more of a coincidence than a design. Anyone willing to fork over the fee can probably join the Inner Circle and I say, if I had the money laying around, I might give it a shot, just to see what it was like.

Saturday, April 28, 2018

Aurora, Texas - Again

This probably should be another edition of “Why I’m Beginning to Dislike Ufology,” but I thought I’d just use it as a single example of what is wrong with us today. I had thought we had finally driven the stake through the heart of the Aurora, Texas, UFO crash of 1897. I thought that the overwhelming evidence showed no such event had taken place. It was, in the terminology of today, “Fake News.” If you wish to read that article that sparked this post you can find it here:


I have written about the Aurora crash on a number of occasions in both books and magazine articles, and a few times on this blog. Rather that revisit all that here and now, just take a look at these links:


and here:


and about halfway through the following article you learn about my personal investigation of the crash, which you can read here:


The point, however, is that there is no evidence that the crash took
Aurora, Texas. Photo copyright by
Kevin Randle
place. Attempts to find bits of the metal supposedly scattered all over the place have failed, excavations conducted in what was supposed to be Judge Proctor’s well found nothing other than a snake, the written record, which should have been vast given the written histories of Wise County published within a decade of the event refutes the idea, and those I interviewed in the early 1970s, before Aurora became the draw it is today told me that nothing happened… and this included people who were alive at the time, though they were youngsters in 1897.

As noted, this is another of the UFO stories that simply won’t die. There are those who wish to keep it alive for reasons that I can’t understand. When the evidence is stacked as high as it is suggesting there was no crash, I do not understand why some simply ignore it, reporting on the nonsense that has become associated with the tale.

The Aurora Cemetery. Photo copyright by
Kevin Randle
I will say one final thing about this because of a comment or two in the latest report on Aurora. What government organization or agency that existed in 1897 was attempting to suppress this information? There was no CIA, no FBI, and Army Intelligence, such as it was, had no reason to care about the airship sightings or a story that appeared in the Dallas – Fort Worth area newspapers… and if you believe that the Air Force of 1947 had some sort of reason to suppress the story at that late date, I would ask for some evidence that they cared enough to attempt it.


No, this is just another reason that UFO research seems to be in decline. Find a solution for a case and there will be those who scream government cover up or label us as “debunkers.” Rather than focus on the truly mysterious, on those cases in which there is no good solution (and yes, I’ll point to the Socorro UFO landing as one of those), they bring back this exciting case of a UFO crash in 1897. Sorry, but that simply isn’t adding to our knowledge and detracts from the good work that could be done.